Locomotive #65

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0-6-0 saddle tank locomotive #65 was built in 1930 by the H. K. Porter Company of Pittsburgh, PA. Number 65 was acquired from the Safe Harbor Water and Power Company of Columbia, PA in 1972. Engine #65 is the last piece of equipment to have arrived at the WK&S by rail. The track south of N. Albany was scrapped soon thereafter and the WK&S became a landlocked railroad. Number 65 powered the majority of WK&S trains for the better part of four decades. But by 2009 the locomotive was used only sporadically and by 2010 it was out of service.

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0-6-0 steam locomotive #65 prepares to couple up to the train for the fist run of the day.

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A close up of #65's drivers.

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Cab lettering.

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Top view.

Locomotive #65 was built in 1930 and first used by The Arundel Corporation of Baltimore, MD for construction of the Safe Harbor Water and Power Company at Columbia, PA in 1930/31. After the dam was constructed the locomotive was sold to Safe Harbor where it would remain for the next four decades. In 1941 the locomotive was reconditioned by the Pennsylvania Railroad. Then for a period during World War II #65 was used as a stationary boiler to provided steam to the Safe Harbor power house. This may have been due to wartime oil shortages. Finally the locomotive was donated to the WK&S in 1972. Aside from initial dam construction, the locomotive appears to have been lightly used at Safe Harbor and arrived at the WK&S in excellent condition.

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Arundel Corporation #65 from 7/18/30. Check out the cross-compound air pump which appears in no other photo.

Following dam construction, the locomotive was sold to Safe Harbor where it remained for four decades. Note the cab lettering in the picture below. In the lower right corner was the stenciled designation "Q-11". Also note the main rod lashed to the footboard. Perhaps the locomotive has just returned from being serviced offsite. Looks like a fresh paint job.

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SAFE HARBOR WATER POWER CORP. #65.

The following three pictures were taken November 6, 1942 and show #65 in use as a stationary boiler. All lettering has been removed. Note the coal supply coupled behind the locomotive. The high and shallow configuration of this odd looking coal car would have made it relatively easy to shovel coal into the locomotive's rear-mounted bunker.

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Number 65 in use as a stationary boiler.

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Number 65 in use as a stationary boiler.

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Number 65 in use as a stationary boiler.

The next three shots show #65 at Safe Harbor being prepped for delivery to the WK&S. Again the main and eccentric rods have been removed for transport.

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2/4/72.

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Note the rods resting between the cylinders and link brackets. 2/4/72.

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Number 65 and WK&S volunteers at the Safe Harbor Water and Power Company. Photo by Bernie Perch.

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Here is #65 at Columbia, PA by the PRR main line (note catenary poles). Locomotive #65 is sitting on the interchange track for the Reading & Columbia branch of the Reading en route to Kempton. The day was snowy and miserable. Photo by Bernie Perch.

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Near Greenawald (between Kempton and Lenhartsville) on 2/12/72. Scrapping of the track was delayed to accommodate this delivery. The scrapper's tiny Vulcan mechanical locomotive is in charge of the move. Photo by Jim Knoll.

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Number 65 has arrived on the main line in down town Kempton. This is in front of Albright's Mill just south the WK&S yard. The Vulcan has uncoupled and moved to the Kempton passing track. The passing track remains, but that section of main line through town no longer exists. Photo by Jim Knoll.

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Number 65 soon after its arrival at the WK&S. Note the missing rods, removed for transport. Note the different headlight and the rotted wood pilot which would be replaced by steel. Little Whitcomb #20 is in charge of the move.

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Another shot of #65 soon after its arrival at the WK&S.

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The picture above and the two below are from 1980 and show #65 at its spiffiest. The saddle tank lettering does not appear to have lasted more than a few years.

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Around 2004 #65 was mocked up to look like Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal locomotive #15. Aside from a difference in valve gear, the two Porters looked a lot alike. This was just a proof of concept mockup using cardboard numbers and letters. I don't believe the WK&S ever actually ran an event with #65 dressed up as such. The real BEDT #15 was acquired by the Strasburg Railroad and rebuilt into a Thomas the Tank Engine. I friggin hate Thomas the Tank Engine.

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Number 65 as BEDT #15.